TI 83/84 Series Calculator Videos

by David Williamson

 

Video Number Video Name Description
1 Turning On & Off A simple video that shows how to turn the calculator on and off.
2 Adjusting Screen Brightness Having difficulty seeing your screen? Too light or dark? This video explains how to adjust the brightness of your screen.
3 MODE Key This videos explains the various modes that you can operate your calculator in. You can watch the entire video for a thorough explanation for the various modes (some you may want to use or will need). To set up your calculator with the most common modes skip to (18:56) in the timeline.
4 Quit & Clear Keys This video explains the similarities and differences between the QUIT and CLEAR Keys and when to use them.
5 2nd Function Key This video explains the use of the 2nd Function Key. You would need to use the 2nd Function Key. For example you would need to use the 2nd Function Key for a calculation such as 3π 16 or to view the CALC Menu (which is frequently used in various math courses).
6 ALPHA Key This video shows how to use the ALPHA key to assign a numerical value to a letter. The ALPHA key is frequently used when you would like to write a program.
7 Store (STO) and Recall (RCL) Keys This video shows an example where it would be useful to store your results from two different questions and recall them later to use in another computation.
8 Basic Calculations & Editing

This video shows how to enter basic calculations such as ( 21÷38+1 )( 10÷20 ) and that the calculator follows the rules for the order of operations (PEMDAS).

You will learn how to edit your entries. Such as the expression above without entering the expression all over again. For example, change the 1 to an 11 and the 20 to a 2.

You will also learn how to recall past entries- even the ones you can not see on the screen.

9 Basic Calculations- Negative Numbers This video shows how to enter negative values. Basic calculations will be shown such as 62 and 24 . Also, you will learn a possible reason for getting a syntax error with computations involving negative values.
10 Basic Calculations- Exponents This video illustrates how to compute exponentials such as 3 2 , 3 4 , and 81 1/4 . At 1:44 in the timeline you will see a common error, that is, the difference between 3 2 and (3) 2 . You will also learn about the exponential keys 10 x and e x for computations such as 10 2 and e 3/5 .
11 Basic Calculations- Roots The main objective of this video is to illustrate how to compute square roots, cube roots, and roots of the nth degree. For example, 144 , 27 3 , and  32 5 . You will also learn about computing roots with non real results such as 16 and see what the calculator displays depending on what mode the calculator is in (REAL or a+bi ). The importance of parenthesis and their use is discussed throughout the video.
12 Basic Calculations- Fractions This video will show you how to get an exact answer when computing fractions. For example, 1 3 + 1 8 = 11 15 instead of the repeating decimal 0.7 3 ¯ . Or once you compute the exact value of 2 3 + 1 8 which is 19 24 , you can then find its decimal equivalent, 0.716666... a repeating decimal (not an exact value). Also learn how to properly raise a fraction to an exponent to avoid getting an incorrect answer.
13 Basic Calculations- Logarithms This video shows how to compute common logarithms ( log 10 a=loga ), for example, log( 100+30 ) . See what the calculator displays when you try to take the logarithm of a negative value. You will also learn how to compute natural logarithms ( log e a=lna ) . For example, the ln8.43 or ln e 6 . You will also learn how to compute logarithms with bases other than 10 or e (start the video at 6:30). For example, log 4 160 .
14 Evaluating Rational Functions & Expressions In this video you will learn how to evaluate rational functions at a specific value and evaluate rational expressions. For example, compute f(3) for f(x)= x 2 +7x+1 3 x 2 2x+3 or evaluate the expression 2 3 345+6 20÷5÷8 . This video also illustrates a practical use of the store key (STO) for the examples above.
15 Absolute Value This video explains how to enter the absolute value symbol when doing calculations such as 23| 4 | .
16 Scientific Notation Learn how to write very large and very small numbers (36,000,000 or 0.0000000586) in scientific notation. Also change the mode of the calculator to express your answers in scientific notation.
17 Expressions with Multiple Grouping Symbols Learn how to input expressions with nested grouping symbols such as 2 2 3{ 2÷4( 3 2 2 ) } and a more complicated expression such as 3{ [ ( 102+8 )÷14 ] 2 8 } .
18 Graphing Functions In this video you will see how to input various types of functions and graph them. The type of functions graphed are linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, and exponential. As a review, the editing keys are used.
19 Graphing Multiple Functions This is a continuation of the Graphing Functions video. Instead of inputting and graphing only one function, this video shows how to input and graph multiple functions in the same viewing window. Also, when graphing multiple functions, you will learn how to temporarily disable particular functions in the input window so they can not be seen in the viewing window; this is useful when the screen is cluttered with too many graphs.
20 Graphing Rational Functions In this video you will learn how to input rational functions correctly, that is, the importance of using parentheses, and you will also graph the rational functions. Some examples of rational functions in this video are y= 3x2 x+1 and y= 25 8 x 2 15 . An important note is that the calculator does not always show an accurate graph of a rational function as seen in the example starting at (20:33) in the timeline.
21 Graphing Exponential & Logarithmic Functions First, this video will show you how to graph an exponential function such as y= 2 x+1 . Then you will learn how to graph common and natural logs. For example, y=2log(7x) and y=ln(x+2)4 respectively. Finally you will learn how to graph a logarithm with a base other than 10 or e. For example, y= log 3 (2x+1) .
22 Graphing Circles and Inverses In this video you will learn two different methods for graphing circles. You will also learn two different methods for graphing the inverse of a function.
23 Using the Table to Evaluate Functions For a function f(x) , learn how to set up a table and choose values for the independent variable x to get the corresponding values for the dependent variable y. Also, you will see how to edit values in the table and what happens when an incorrect value of x is used; that is, x is not in the domain for the function f(x) . Finally, learn how to discover patterns for a function by properly setting up the table; start at (11:25) in the timeline.
24 Using the Table with Two Functions

This video is an extension of the previous video (#23) "Use the Table to Evaluate Functions" and you should watch the previous video before this one. You will be graphing two functions and using the table to find the sum and product of two functions at specified values of x. For example, given f ( x ) = x + 3  and  g ( x ) = x 2 2 find h ( x ) = f ( x ) + g ( x )  and  h ( x ) = f ( x ) g ( x ) when x = 2 , 0 , 1 , 5 . During this example, and other examples, you will see the practical use of the VARS key.

25 Adjusting the Graphing Window There are times where you can not see all of the graph for a particular function because the viewing window is not set properly. This video shows how to adjust the viewing window for a more comprehensive representation of the function you are graphing. You will also learn how to adjust the incremental spacing on the x-axis and y-axis.
26 Finding A Good Window For a better understanding of this topic, it is recommended you watch the previous video (#25) "Adjusting the Graphing Window". There will be many instances when you graph a function in the standard viewing window and there is no graph or it does not show a good representation of the function. Finding an appropriate viewing window can be difficult, however, with the use of the calculators table feature you will be able to identify patterns that will help you select an appropriate viewing window. Not only using the table, but some basic knowledge about odd and even functions, symmetry, end behavior, and what the general shape of basic functions look like will also help when setting up an appropriate viewing window. The three functions used in the examples are: f(x)=2 x 3 +12 x 2 +19x9 f(x)= 1.05 x +50x2500 f(x)=0.005 x 4 +0.8 x 3 2 x 2 +7x6000
27 Zoom Box Even when you have a descent viewing window for your graph, there may be some uncertainty of what is actually happening to the function over particular intervals in the domain. To get a more accurate understanding of the functions behavior over a particular interval, the use of the zoom box feature is very useful. The zoom box feature is also used when you want to zoom in on a particular region to help find the intersection points of two functions or zeros and intercepts. You will also learn the practical use of the zoom previous feature which starts at (23:00) on the timeline.
28 Zoom In and Zoom Previous An alternative to using the zoom box feature is zoom-in. Sometimes the zoom-in feature is a quicker way to get the desired results compared to using zoom box. Just note that zoom box gives you better control because it allows you to choose the exact area that you want to zoom in on.
29 TRACE Key In this video you will learn how to use the TRACE key for a quick way of finding ordered pairs on the function and approximate other points of interest such as the zeros, intercepts, maximums, and minimums. In addition you will also learn how to approximate the solution for a system of two equations or to approximate the solution to an equation.
30 CALC- Value The CALC- value option is used when evaluating at most two values for f(x); otherwise using the table is more efficient when evaluating more than two values. You will also learn a shortcut, that is an alternative to using CALC- value. Also, discover what happens when you try to input a value of x that is not shown in the viewing window or when trying to input values that are not in the domain of the function. Finally, you will learn how to evaluate two functions simultaneously for a specified value of x. For example, if f(x)=2x+1 and g(x)= x 4 4 x 3 +2 x 2 x+5 , evaluate f(4) and g(4) .
31 CALC- Zero Recall in the "Trace Key" video (#29) the zeros for the functions were only approximations. Using the CALC- zero option you will find the exact values for the zeros.
32 CALC- Maximum and Minimum In this video you will learn how to find the coordinates of the maximum or minimum for a given function.
33 CALC- Intersect The CALC- intersect option allows you to solve an equation or a system of two equations. Note from the TRACE Key video (#29), the solutions were only approximations. The examples you will be watching are solve the equation 3 x+1 =15 and solve the system of equations y=| x+5 | and y=7x3 .
34 Matrix- Dimension and Editing In this video you will learn how to set-up a matrix as well as edit any cells of the matrix.
35 Matrix- Row Echelon Form In this video you will learn how to use a matrix in row echelon form to solve a system with three equations and three variables. There are three examples that will demonstrate the different possible solutions, that is, one solution, no solution, and infinitely many solutions.
36 Matrix- Reduced Row Echelon Form In this video you will learn how to use a matrix in reduced row echelon form to solve a system with three equations and three variables. There are three examples that will demonstrate the different possible solutions, that is, one solution, no solution, and infinitely many solutions.
37 Matrix- Addition and Subtraction This video will guide you through the process of adding and subtracting matrices. In addition you will learn what happens when you try to add (or subtract) matrices with different dimensions.
38 Matrix- Multiplication In this video you will learn how to calculate scalar multiplication of a matrix and the product of two matrices. In addition, you will find out what happens when you try to compute the product of two matrices where the number of columns of the first matrix does not equal the number of rows of the second matrix.
39 Matrix- Determinant & Inverse If you need to compute the determinant or inverse of a matrix, this video will guide you through the steps. You will also learn about an error message when trying to find the inverse of a singular matrix.
40 Matrix Equation As seen in video #36 and #37, you will solve a system of equations with three variables. This time, the matrix equation, AX=B , will be used to find the solutions. You will also learn in examples two and three why you get an error when using the matrix equation and what to do if you encounter this error (start at 4:58 in the timeline).
41 Summation This video will teach you how to find the sum of a given sequence. For example, i=3 25 (3i20) 2 or j=1 100 (3j2)5 j=10 80 2j j1 .
42 Regression In this video you will learn how to utilize the plot and regression features when asked to find an equation that models a given set of data. Linear and exponential regression are used as examples. Note that the steps are similar for other models, such as quadratic regression, logarithmic regression, etc.
43 Graphing Piecewise Functions This video will show you the correct notation when you need to graph a piecewise function. One of the piecewise functions you will graph is f(x)={ x+2 ifx<1 0.03 (x1) 3 ifx1
44 Basic Programming- The Quadratic Formula In this video you will learn some basic programming and editing techniques while writing a program for the Quadratic Formula. There are many times you will need to use the Quadratic formula and this handy program will quickly get you the results.
45 Basic Programming- Change of Base Formula In this video you will learn how to program the Change of Base Formula. This program is specifically useful if you have a TI-83 series calculator and you need to compute the logarithm with a base other than 10 or e.

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